Acts 27:1-44

Acts

Acts 27:1-3:

27:1But as it was judged (for) us to sail-away into Italy, they gave-over both Paul and some different prisoners to a centurion, Julius by-name of Augustus’ corps. .2And having gone-on (board) an Adramyttium ship being about to sail into the places according to Asia, we were led-up (by ship), Aristarchus a Macedonian of Thessalonica being together with us. .3And on a different (day) we were led-down into Sidon, and Julius having used Paul with-love-for-man permitted (him) to attain care having journeyed towards (his) friends.

Verse 1 indicates that Luke is again with Paul. When the decision had been made for Paul and Luke to begin their journey to Italy, those who were watching Paul gave him along (delivered him) and some other sort of prisoners into the custody of a centurion (commanding 100 soldiers) named Julius of the imperial corps, no longer under the direct or indirect supervision of Festus. Paul was on his way to meet with Caesar in Rome.

They went on board a ship from Adramyttium, a city in Mysia which is a province of Asia-minor. Also with Paul and Luke was a Macedonian man named Aristarchus from the city of Thessalonica. Both Luke and Aristarchus were allowed to travel with Paul probably as his servants.

On a different day they landed in Sidon, a port of Phoenicia which is about 70 miles north of Caesarea. Julius the centurion used (furnished, treated) Paul with a friendly/brotherly love for mankind (humanely) and thus allowed Paul to journey towards his friends (those who loved Paul with the brotherly/ friendly kind of love) in order to obtain the care and attention which he needed – how kind!

As we read this record, it will be helpful for us to notice that the word “they” is used referring to those on the ship excluding Paul and Luke and Aristarchus, and the word “we” is used referring to everybody on the ship including Paul and Luke and Aristarchus.

[Reference: Acts 9:15, 11:19, 19:21 and 29, 20:4, 23:11; Colossians 4:10; Philemon 1:24.]

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